Job Search Tips From a Hiring Manager

Ever want to know what is going on inside the mind of a hiring manager? Well, you are in for a treat. I recently had a fascinating conversation with Darrell Lim of Oak Management Consulting. Darrell is a strategic business leader, corporate trainer, and coach. He has many years of hiring experience in a variety of industries including retail, software, non-profit, and manufacturing and he has hired for a range of positions from front-line employees (customer service and production) up to highly specialized technical and creative experts and organizational leaders.

I asked Darrell to share about the recruitment process that he generally follows and I am glad that he did. There are some fantastic nuggets of wisdom here for job seekers! 

1. Create a Recruitment Culture: Instead of hiring when there is an urgent need or vacancy, Darrell advocates for businesses to take a more strategic approach. He encourages organizations to always be open to having conversations with potential candidates and he sees great value in conducting informational interviews with interested candidates even when not actively hiring. This ensures that companies already have a qualified pool of candidates ready to go when they DO need to hire, and mitigates the risk of hiring weak candidates because they need to fill a position.

Tip: One of the greatest falsehoods in job search is that employers do not want to talk to potential job seekers. This is not true. Make informational interviews and networking an active part of your job search strategy. 

2. Discuss Needs with the Hiring Manager: Once a vacancy comes up, Darrell will work with the hiring manager to understand their needs and vision for the new position. Just because there is a position does not mean that it needs to be filled exactly as is. Darrell asks the hard questions: Does this position actually need to be filled? If it does need to be filled, does the position need to be changed in any way?  

Tip: When a position becomes vacant, it may not be filled in exactly the same way as it was in the past. This is an opportunity for you as a job seeker. By reaching out through networking, you may be able to position yourself as a potential answer to the company’s needs even if you do not have the same qualifications, education, or experience that the previous employee had. 

3. Create the Job Posting and Circulate: After determining the best position to fill the needs of the organization, Darrell focuses on creating a detailed job description. He posts it to various job search sites depending on the position type. Indeed and craigslist are favorites for entry-level positions while LinkedIn is a good option for more technical or leadership positions. Darrell generally waits 2-3 weeks before reviewing applications as he wants to maximize his time by having a critical mass of applications. 

Tip: Applied for a job and have not heard back yet?  Be patient. The hiring manager or recruiter may not have reviewed your application yet. 

4 .Review Job Postings: When it comes to reviewing applications, Darrell wants to see a resume and cover letter that are targeted to the job that was posted.  For each time that the resume contains vague or fluffy information unrelated to the job posting, Darrell mentally gives the job seeker a demerit point. After an applicant has accumulated 5-6 demerits, depending on the role, he moves onto another applicant. He does look carefully for technical competence and educational levels. And lastly, he always reads the “Volunteer Work” section as a way of trying to gauge company culture fit.

Tip: One of the critical mistakes that job seekers make is not targeting their resume to the job posting. Creating a targeted resume for each job you apply for is critical! 

Tip: Consider having a “Volunteer Work” section on your resume. 

5. Conduct a Phone Screening Call: After reviewing applications, Darrell then conducts 10 -1 5 minute phone screenings. He wants to weed out people who do not fit in company culture. Often, he quickly gets a feel for people even within the first few minutes, particularly if the conversation is awkward or if the applicant only gives one-word answers. Unfortunately about 50% of people have not carefully read through the job description and are often unable to answer any questions related to the position or company. 

Tip: Keep track of the companies that you apply for.  Each time you apply for a job, create a folder (electronic or paper) with a copy of your cover letter, resume and the job posting along with any company research you may have conducted. You may be looking for any job, but companies want to know that you want to work for THEM! 

Tip: Practice your phone manner. If you find the phone awkward, find someone to practice with even if they are just in another room in your home.  

6. Perform Second and Third Rounds of Interviews: Throughout the interview process, Darrell talks about looking for three things: competence, character, and chemistry. He wants to know that the person to be hired is able to do the job! One of the ways that he screens for this is through using behavior-based questions. He includes questions regarding ethics to assess character.  And then finally, he is looking for someone that he finds a connection with.

Darrell shared that he has recently been using web technology in his interviews, specifically Google hangouts.  He has been conducting group interviews with 4-6 people through Google hangouts. For technical or creative positions, he may give the individual a small task to complete as part of the interview. 

For the final interview, Darrell will often meet candidates at a coffee shop or at the company site.  Here, he will ask more detailed questions about the applicant’s background and career.

Tip: Be prepared for anything in terms of interview format! 

Tip: Practice your behavior-based questions which ask you to share what you have done in the past. Often these interviews questions will start with “Tell me about a time…” 

As you can see, the employer and recruiter put a huge amount of effort into the hiring process. The next time you submit an application, try putting yourself into the employer’s shoes and implement some of the tips shared here! 

If this information has been helpful, but you feel that you could use more help with your job search, consider connecting with Career Story for support. We offer resume writing and interview preparationservices at affordable prices. Please contact us at 604-614-3155 or at info@careerstory.ca